Category Archives: Glosso’s got the gaffes

In the news … (Jan 8)

forcecrawl

In the news … is back by popular demand. And to kick off the New Year, we have some exciting news items on the following subjects: how to speak development jargon; is it a punctuation error or a spoiler in the new Star Wars opening crawl?; a teacher giving a Twitter troll a lesson in tolerance and grammar; some evidence that grammar might be a basic instinct; and finally, the insincerity of punctuation. Really. Continue reading

Honey, Obama shrunk his past participle

obamagun

Speaking at his televised town hall meeting on gun control this evening, President Obama caught himself making a classic linguistic gaffe involving the past tense of the verb “to shrink”. I shrink, I shrank, I have shrunk; it shrinks, it shrank, it has been shrunk. But as Obama talked about the ATF budget in the past passive, he picked the wrong participle — as many people tend to do with the verb these days. “It is absolutely true that the ATF budget has been shrank,” our President said, with a slightly faltering voice that hinted he knew he’d messed up. And sure enough, after skipping just a couple of beats, he provided one of the few moments of levity in the evening’s otherwise deadly serious discussion, when he corrected himself with a smile and an apology for his tardy self-edit: “Has been shrunk. It is a little late,” he said, realizing that he fessed up a bit too long after he made his gaffe, and eliciting the one and only peal of laughter from his audience, “but you knew what I meant.” We know what you meant, Barack. But we’re glad you realized and pointed out your mistake. Even you can be fallible.

See Glossophilia’s earlier post on the shrunk/shrank confusion that gets even the most articulate and eloquent speakers.

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In the news … (May 22)

wimpykidlatin

TGIF: That Gerund Is Funky. Stories about language usage in the news this past month include unexpected Latin translations; an inappropriate exclamation mark; a famous fictional advertising exec showing off his grammatical prowess; a grammatically correct bank robber; football fans ranked by spelling and grammar ability; a punctuation-free doctoral dissertation; and a very expensive web site name.

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