Glosso’s advent calendar: Baubles of Britishisms – Dec 6

Coventry1

Day 6 of Glosso’s popular evergreen advent calendar, “Baubles of Britishisms”. Each day, leading up to the quintessential British day of rest and relaxation (“Boxing Day”), you’ll open a window to the world of quirky Brit-speak.

***

To send someone to Coventry.

“He also had to learn to stop saying things like ‘barth’ instead of ‘bath’. “There’s no bloody R in it, yer poncy bugger,” her dad would say. I’ve since looked it up, and he was right. It’s just one giant melting pot round by us now, and nobody bats an eyeball these days if you say you’re going out with somebody from Small Heath. But in those days it was voodoo, and anybody that broke the rules could face being ostrichised or, worse still, sent to Coventry, which apparently is even further south than Birmingham.” — “Lazy Cow” Doreen tells her story in the Birmingham Mail, 16 Nov 2014

To refuse to associate with or speak to someone: a very British way of ostracizing and ignoring someone. Wikipedia offers an explanation: “The origins of this phrase are unknown, although it is quite probable that events in Coventry in the English Civil War in the 1640s play a part. One hypothesis as to its origin is based upon The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon. In this work, Hyde recounts how Royalist troops that were captured in Birmingham were taken as prisoners to Coventry, which was a Parliamentarian stronghold. These troops were often not received warmly by the locals.”

Glosso’s advent calendar: Baubles of Britishisms – Dec 5

finger

Day 5 of Glosso’s popular evergreen advent calendar, “Baubles of Britishisms”. Each day, leading up to the quintessential British day of rest and relaxation (“Boxing Day”), you’ll open a window to the world of quirky Brit-speak.

***

On your bike!  

“Poking fun at Mujuru, the state press have run headlines such as “On your bike ma’am” and “Mujuru to learn of her fate” suggesting her time in power is up.” — Johannesburg’s Daily Vox, 23 Oct 2014

Also:

Sod off! “Above all, these self-pitying, hard done by right wingers fail to understand the history of how human interaction takes place, namely: one person says an idea – then another person responds with another idea. That’s democracy boys. If you don’t like it Ukipers – go and live somewhere else. This is England. This is Britain. If you don’t like our values then you should sod off somewhere else.” — Lee Kern, Huffington Post UK, 31 Oct 2014

Naff off! “For me, the most painful aspect of this fiesta of spiteful innuendo has been to hear this smart graduate in English and drama defend herself with new-agey guff about “growing as a creative person and finally growing into myself”. Bridget might have managed a crisper ‘Naff off‘.” — The Independent, on Renee Zellweger’s plastic surgery, 24 Oct 2014

Be off with you. Go away. Get out of my face. Or a more polite British way of saying “f*** off”.

Glosso’s advent calendar: Baubles of Britishisms – Dec 4

runner

Day 4 of Glosso’s popular evergreen advent calendar, “Baubles of Britishisms”. Each day, leading up to the quintessential British day of rest and relaxation (“Boxing Day”), you’ll open a window to the world of quirky Brit-speak.

***

To do a runner.

“Paternal intervention can be summarised by Francis’s classic interjection: ‘Oh, Humphrey, do stop being a bore. You’re being a f***ing nuisance. F*** off.’ The only rule, says Edmund, was not being allowed to lose the TV remote. Francis’s childhood was not dissimilar. He recalls that, when his governess appealed for disciplinary aid, ‘There’d be a pause, then the front door would slam as Dad did a runner.'” — Radio Times, 28 Oct 2104

“Carla told him the police were on their way and confirmed she had told the police he had confessed to murdering Tina. ‘You betrayed me. I begged you for another chance!’ Rob wailed. ‘And I really wanted to give it to you,’ insisted Carla. ‘No matter what happens, you’ll always be my brother.’ Biologically, this was hard to argue with. Rob did the only sensible thing left open to him – he did a runner.” — a Coronation Street plot summary in the Daily Mail, 31 Oct 2014

To leave hastily, especially to avoid paying for something or to escape from a difficult place or situation. To get the hell out of dodge.

*   *   *

Glosso’s advent calendar: Baubles of Britishisms – Dec 3

camel

Day 3 of Glosso’s popular evergreen advent calendar, “Baubles of Britishisms”. Each day, leading up to the quintessential British day of rest and relaxation (“Boxing Day”), you’ll open a window to the world of quirky Brit-speak.

***

Got the hump.

“Don’t get me wrong, not getting work marked is irritating; assessments involve hard work, and the wait for grades is tense. In my second year, an IT failure led to the publication of my results being delayed by 24 hours. I got the hump.” — The Independent, Nov 16, 2014

Read Rudyard Kipling’s “Just So” story How the Camel Got His Hump” on Lit2Go for a possible explanation.

Also:

Brassed off: “We’re all right brassed off with the state of this nation and over the past 800 or so words…you’ll surely concur I’ve provided watertight, incontrovertible, rigorous and downright sexy proof that this revolution will work and that it needs to happen.” — Huffington Post UK, Nov 13 2104

Continue reading

Why is it called Omicron?

The New York Times explains it all:

“When the W.H.O. began to name emerging variants of the coronavirus, they turned to the Greek alphabet — Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta and so on — to make them easier to describe. The first “variant of concern,” Alpha, was identified in Britain in late 2020, soon followed by Beta in South Africa.

“But veterans of American sorority and fraternity life might have noticed the system has skipped the next two letters in the alphabetical order: Nu and Xi.

“Officials thought Nu would be too easily confused with “new,” but the next letter, Xi, is a bit more complicated. W.H.O. officials said it was a common last name, and therefore potentially confusing. Some noted that it is also the name of China’s top leader, Xi Jinping.

“A spokesman for the W.H.O. said the organization’s policy was designed to avoid “causing offense to any cultural, social, national, regional, professional, or ethnic groups.”

“Next in line? Omicron.”

From Omicron: What Is Known – and Still Unknown by Andrew Jacobs, New York Times, Dec 2, 2021

* * * * *

Glosso’s advent calendar: Baubles of Britishisms – Dec 2

plasters

Day 2 of Glosso’s popular evergreen advent calendar, “Baubles of Britishisms”. Each day, leading up to the quintessential British day of rest and relaxation (“Boxing Day”), you’ll open a window to the world of quirky Brit-speak.

***

In the wars.

“Allen is back on the field with his head wrapped up in bandages. He has certainly been in the wars lately after also being smashed in the face by Fellaini in the Belgium vs. Wales game, but this latest wound doesn’t seem to be bothering him too much.” — Sports Mole, 23 Nov 2014

In the wars? The 62-year-old seemed to be sporting a fat lip perhaps the result of his daily boxing classes.” — Daily Mail‘s picture caption describing Mickey Rourke

To have injuries to many different parts of the body, or multiple health problems. Often used ironically to describe someone with minor injuries. As WiseGeek explains, it originally referred only to soldiers who had literally been in the wars, but now it’s for anyone feeling a bit sorry for themselves because of ailments large and small.

Glosso’s advent calendar: Baubles of Britishisms – Dec 1

clogs

In the run-up to Christmas, Glosso offers its popular evergreen advent calendar, “Baubles of Britishisms”. Each day, leading up to the quintessential British day of rest and relaxation – “Boxing Day” – you’ll open a window to the world of quirky Brit-speak.

***

On day 1, we’ll kick off with one of our euphemisms for kicking the bucket. What could be more quintessentially English? Continue reading

The advent of Glosso’s advent calendar …

Back by popular demand, Glosso’s shiny advent calendar will be running again this year, starting (of course) on Wednesday, Dec 1. Check in for your “Baubles of Britishisms,” which run daily through our most British of named holidays, “Boxing Day.” (And if you don’t know what day that is, then just keep opening your bauble windows, and you’ll find out soon enough.)

There might be another surprise buried among the baubles: we’ll keep you posted.

* * * * *